Our Land Was A Forest: An Ainu Memoir Transitions : Asia and Asian America

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Routledge #ad - Kayano describes with disarming simplicity and frankness the personal conflicts he faced as a result of the tensions between a traditional and a modern society and his lifelong efforts to fortify a living Ainu culture. This book is a beautiful and moving personal account of the Ainu, economy, Japan's northern island, the native inhabitants of Hokkaidō, whose land, and culture have been absorbed and destroyed in recent centuries by advancing Japanese.

A master storyteller, farming, which revolved around bear hunting, he paints a vivid picture of the ecologically sensitive Ainu lifestyle, fishing, and woodcutting. Speaking with a rare directness to the Ainu and universal human experience, this book will interest all readers concerned with the fate of indigenous peoples.

Our Land Was A Forest: An Ainu Memoir Transitions : Asia and Asian America #ad - Based on the author's own experiences and on stories passed down from generation to generation, the book chronicles the disappearing world—and courageous rebirth—of this little-understood people. Unlike the few existing ethnographies of the Ainu, this account is the first written by an insider intimately tied to his own culture yet familiar with the ways of outsiders.

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The Diary of Lady Murasaki Penguin Classics

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Penguin #ad - Told in a series of vignettes, and telling remarks about the timid Empress and her powerful father, rivalries between the Emperor's consorts, with sharp criticism of Murasaki's fellow ladies-in-waiting and drunken courtiers, it offers revealing glimpses of the Japanese imperial palace - the auspicious birth of a prince, Michinaga.

The Diary of Lady Murasaki Penguin Classics #ad - The diary is also a work of great subtlety and intense personal reflection, as Murasaki makes penetrating insights into human psychology - her pragmatic observations always balanced by an exquisite and pensive melancholy. 1020, author of the tale of genji, is an intimate picture of her life as tutor and companion to the young Empress Shoshi.

973-c. The diary recorded by Lady Murasaki c.

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Requiem for Battleship Yamato

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Naval Institute Press #ad - Requiem for Battleship Yamato #ad - A young ensign on the bridge of the fabled battleship Yamato during her final battle, recounts his experience.

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A Concise History of Japan Cambridge Concise Histories

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Cambridge University Press #ad - It is a history for our times, posing important questions regarding how we should situate a nation's history in an age of environmental and climatological uncertainties. To this day, japan's modern ascendancy challenges many assumptions about world history, particularly theories regarding the rise of the west and why the modern world looks the way it does.

A Concise History of Japan Cambridge Concise Histories #ad - Integrating the pageantry of a unique nation's history with today's environmental concerns, Walker's vibrant and accessible new narrative then follows Japan's ascension from the ashes of World War II into the thriving nation of today. In this engaging new history, Brett L. The book begins by tracing the country's early history through archaeological remains, civil conflict, the rise of the samurai, encounters with Europe, before proceeding to explore life in the imperial court, and the advent of modernity and empire.

Walker tackles key themes regarding Japan's relationships with its minorities, state and economic development, and the uses of science and medicine.

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Essays in Idleness

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Cosimo Classics #ad - Yoshida Kenko c. 1283-1352 was a buddhist priest, a reclusive scholar and poet who had ties to the aristocracy of medieval Japan. He touched on topics as diverse as the benefits of the simple life "there is indeed none but the complete hermit who leads a desirable life", lust "What a weakly thing is this heart of ours", and reading "To sit alone in the lamplight with a book spread out before you, solitude "I am happiest when I have nothing to distract me and I am completely alone", the impermanence of this world "Truly the beauty of life is its uncertainty", and hold intimate converse with men of unseen generations--such is a pleasure beyond compare".

His essays in idleness is a collection of his thoughts on his inner world and the world of Japanese life in the fourteenth century. To enter kenko's world is to enter a world of intimate observations, deceptively simple wisdom, and surprising wit. Despite his links to the Imperial court, Kenko spent much time in seclusion and mused on Buddhist and Taoist teachings.

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The Song The Owl God Sang

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BJS Books #ad - Each yukar is narrated by a spirit -- fox, frog, whale, or even shellfish. A clear introduction to chiri, and its language is provided, her book, giving the reader a vivid insight into this startlingly sophisticated spiritual tradition. Her clear and beautiful yet intricate and emotive Japanese translations brought Ainu culture to a wide audience in Japan and created a movement to record and preserve Ainu belief in a living state.

Descended from a line of female storytellers, she devised a way of representing Ainu language in the Roman alphabet, and made Japanese translations of the most important tales. Although she died at 19, the thirteen tales she had written down went on to become a sensation. This book presents new English translations of Chiri's remarkable work.

Originally written in yukar form, a type of chant used by female storytellers among the Ainu villages of Hokkaido, these stories tell of the relationship between mankind and the world of spirits. Most important is the owl god, Kotankor Kamui, whose two long songs describe the covenant between humans and the spirits who provide them with food.

The Song The Owl God Sang #ad - . In many ways, the idea of trying to learn from and preserve tribal wisdom goes back to Chiri's book. Chiri's work includes the best-known passages of Ainu literature: Chiri's original introduction, an elegy to the vanishing Ainu way of life, and the tale 'Silver drops fall around, golden drops fall around'.

This translation tries to preserve the rich texture of Chiri's versions in English, while remaining absolutely true to the details of the original.

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Essays in Idleness: and Hojoki Penguin Classics

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Penguin #ad - Today he is remembered for his wise and witty aphorisms, 'Essays in Idleness'. Meredith mckinney, who has also translated Sei Shonagon's The Pillow Book for Penguin Classics, is a translator of both contemporary and classical Japanese literature. Meredith mckinney's excellent new translation also includes notes and an introduction exploring the spiritual and historical background of the works.

Chômei was born into a family of Shinto priests in around 1155, at at time when the stable world of the court was rapidly breaking up. From ribald stories of drunken monks to aching nostalgia for the fading traditions of the Japanese court, Essays in Idleness is a constantly surprising work that ranges across the spectrum of human experience.

These cameo-like vignettes reflect the importance of the little, fleeting futile things, and each essay is Kenko himself' Asian Student. He became an important though minor poet of his day, and at the age of fifty, withdrew from the world to become a tonsured monk. In the short memoir hôjôki, chômei recounts his decision to withdraw from worldly affairs and live as a hermit in a tiny hut in the mountains, contemplating the impermanence of human existence.

Essays in Idleness: and Hojoki Penguin Classics #ad - He probably became a monk in his late twenties, and was also noted as a calligrapher. Kenko, displays a fascination with more earthy matters in his collection of anecdotes, however, advice and observations. She lived in japan for twenty years and is currently a visitng fellow at the Australian National University in Canberra.

Essays in idleness is a most delightful book, and one that has served as a model of Japanese style and taste since the 17th century.

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Bound Feet & Western Dress: A Memoir

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Anchor #ad - In china, a woman is nothing. Thus begins the saga of a woman born at the turn of the century to a well-to-do, highly respected Chinese family, a woman who continually defied the expectations of her family and the traditions of her culture. In the alternating voices of two generations, this dual memoir brings together a deeply textured portrait of a woman's life in China with the very American story of Yu-i's brilliant and assimilated grandniece, struggling with her own search for identity and belonging.

Written in pitch-perfect prose and alive with detail, Bound Feet and Western Dress is the story of independent women struggling to emerge from centuries of customs and duty. Growing up in the perilous years between the fall of the last emperor and the communist Revolution, her scandalous divorce, Chang Yu-i's life is marked by a series of rebellions: her refusal as a child to let her mother bind her feet, and her rise to Vice President of China's first women's bank in her later years.

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The Cape: and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto Stone Bridge Fiction

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Stone Bridge Press #ad - Born into the burakumin—japan’s class of outcasts—Kenji Nakagami depicts the lives of his people in sensual language and stark detail. Includes house on Fire and Red Hair. The cape is a breakthrough novella about a burakumin community, their troubled memories, and complex family histories. Kenji nakagami 1946–92 was a prolific writer admired for his vigorous prose style.

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The Ainu and their folk-lore

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#ad - The ainu and their folk-lore 642 pages.

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When Languages Die: The Extinction of the World's Languages and the Erosion of Human Knowledge Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics

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Oxford University Press #ad - The phenomenon known as language death has started to accelerate as the world has grown smaller. This extinction of languages, and the knowledge therein, has no parallel in human history. It will fascinate linguists, anthropologists, and general readers. This knowledge is not only our cultural heritage oral histories, poetry, stories, etc.

But very useful knowledge about plants, animals, the seasons, and other aspects of the natural world--not to mention our understanding of the capacities of the human mind. Harrison's book is a testament not only to the pressing issue of language death, but to the remarkable span of human knowledge and ingenuity.

David harrison's book is the first to focus on the essential question, to north america, to the Himalayas and elsewhere, what is lost when a language dies? What forms of knowledge are embedded in a language's structure and vocabulary? And how harmful is it to humanity that such knowledge is lost forever?Harrison spans the globe from Siberia, to look at the human knowledge that is slowly being lost as the languages that express it fade from sight.

When Languages Die: The Extinction of the World's Languages and the Erosion of Human Knowledge Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics #ad - It is commonly agreed by linguists and anthropologists that the majority of languages spoken now around the globe will likely disappear within our lifetime. He uses fascinating anecdotes and portraits of some of these languages' last remaining speakers, in order to demonstrate that this knowledge about ourselves and the world is inherently precious and once gone, will be lost forever.

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